We have in the Nintendo Switch a custom variation of the Tegra X1, under-timed to 768 MHz. It packs 256 shader centers. The Tegra X1’s GPU is sensibly quick, considering its versatile legacy. Figuring in the data transfer capacity limitations forced by LPDDR3 memory, we’re taking a gander at a section that would perform sensibly near a GT 920 MX, in a Windows situation. That is the most ideal situation for the X1, as found in Nvidia’s Shield Microconsole and the Google Pixel C. With the Nintendo Switch, be that as it may, Digital Foundry’s sources demonstrate that Nintendo has downclocked the X1’s GPU segment to 768 MHz. That is a 25 percent drop-off. This is apparently to remain inside preservationist warm and control envelopes. Additionally, remember this is for when the console is docked.

nintendo switch
via technobuffalo

Nintendo Switch analysis

At the point when the Nintendo Switch is undocked, for a more mobile play, we see a further 40 percent drop-off in GPU clock speed. This comes to 387 MHz. Viably, the Nintendo Switch’s GPU invests the vast majority of its energy working at a small amount of what the X1 is able to do. This means Wii U levels of graphical execution when undocked. It additionally implies a slight uptick when docked. This would help the Nintendo Switch yield higher resolutions when connected to a TV.

This is clear in Legend Of Zelda Breath of the Wild. The game delivers a 900p yield when docked, dropping down to 720p when undocked. Now, we’re quite recently going to skirt past the staggeringly exasperating truth that The Legend Of Zelda Breath of the Wild, a port of last-gen title, is obviously not able to hit 1080p on the Nintendo Switch. It’s even more exasperating when you see it can’t even do that when the Nintendo Switch is docked. With 4K appropriation rates on the ascent (a market that the PS4 Pro and Xbox Scorpio are taking into account), it’s hard to consider individuals squinting at games that render at one-eighth local resolution, a few years down the line.

Source: Forbes