By now, a lot of iPhone fans are eagerly waiting for yet another juicy tidbit from the upcoming iPhone 8. Since it was first reported, the tenth anniversary iPhone is said to be a revolutionary device that will blow away the competition. Now, a new report seems to suggest that it might not be the case. Instead, the iPhone 8 will look very much like a normal Android smartphone. To cap it off, the report also mentioned that there will not be any iPhone 8 this year, it will be called iPhone Edition instead.

iPhone 8 with rear TouchID Sensor

According to iDrop News, the iPhone 8, or rather the iPhone Edition, will most likely look like a premium Android phone. The report suggests that it will have an almost similar design as the Samsung Galaxy S8. The reason for this is that Apple ditched two key design features on the iPhone Edition: the glass backing and embedded TouchID sensor.

The report claims that the source of the news is someone who works directly for Foxconn, Apple’s main contractor for its iDevices. According to the source, the design of the iPhone 8 or iPhone Edition is nearing its completion. It also said that Apple scrapped the idea of the glass backing due to strength issues. Meanwhile, the embedded TouchID sensor was also put on hold since the company feels that it is still premature at this stage.

Because the embedded TouchID sensor is now out of the question, Apple then resorted to putting the said component at the back of the device. Furthermore, since the casing of the iPhone Edition will now be metal, there is now a question whether it will still support wireless charging. With a metal enclosure, it will be quite impossible to include wireless charging in the original specs.

Other interesting details about the leak involve the front and back cameras of the iPhone 8. According to the leak, the rear cameras will be positioned vertically to make it easier to support an AR or VR headset. In addition to this, there will also be two cameras in the front and that these will be used for 3D facial recognition.

On the flip side, there is no solid evidence to support these claims. Like any other leaks or information not coming from the actual device maker, this too should be taken with a grain of salt.