PaperSeven recently took us through a portion of Blackwood Crossing and discussed their approach to the gameplay and the narrative. Blackwood Crossing launches on Xbox, PS4, and Steam early 2017.

blackwood crossing
via blackwood crossing

What is new in Blackwood Crossing so far?

It looks like a story about loss and guilt. Maybe it’s going to focus on the stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and then acceptance. It looks enchanting and kind of reminds us of the first time we watched the Life Is Strange trailer, which we went on to adore. It’s good to have this on our radar now.

Blackwood Crossing looks good, but the lack of context made players more confused than interested. It looks a lot story driven so they don’t want to give away anything. We personally thought the confusion made it more engaging. However, we have little to no idea as to what the story is actually about, but we’re sure the full game will solve that.

We can’t hear the name Finn without thinking of a particular cartoon. Seems like one of those games that are sort of therapeutic or cathartic in a way. We already want the soundtrack, it puts you in such a relaxed state. Players already like the art style and the sort of dreamy presentation. Also, she (the protagonist) needs to get some nail polish remover or some new nail polish. Kind of a 3D point and click adventure that makes you feel like more of an observer watching a movie than really playing a game. If it’s on PC, players probably won’t get it because of so many similar titles but if it came to the Xbox One as a download a lot of players might consider it.

Blackwood Crossing is a single-player, first-person narrative game. An intriguing tale exploring the relationship of Scarlett and Finn, two siblings who are growing apart. When their paths cross with a ghostly figure, an ordinary train ride evolves into a haunting adventure of love, death, and magic.